Dallas Plans New Farmers Market

View from Taylor and Pearl
View from Taylor and Pearl

Re-blogged from: http://city hall blog.Dallas news.com

By Robert Wilonsky
rwilonsky@dallasnews.com
8:40 am on December 2, 2013

Update at 10 a.m.: As expected, the Economic Development Committee voted to send the Dallas Farmer Market’s five TIF agreements to the full council for a December 11 vote. But that was after an hour-long discussion during which council member Jerry Allen wanted to make sure the new ownership group wasn’t just building a “an apartment development around an entertainment thing called a farmers market.”

Said Allen, he was especially concerned about the loss of Pecan Lodge, which is moving to Elm Street in Deep Ellum.

” That’s one of the top barbecue spots in Texas, but it’s an attitude,” he said. “Those guys attract so many folks to the market. That creates an attitude. When we lost that deal that perked my ears up.” He asked Brian Bergersen to explain his “true vision” for the market.

“We’ve always said the most important part of this redevelopment is Shed 1,” Bergersen told him. “That is the farmers market. The retail and restaurants compliment that. But the most important part of the farmers market is making sure we have fresh produce and it’s year-round.”

He said they have a coordinator working with farmers, and that they’re attempting to bring back folks who’ve left in the last couple of years. Council member Rick Callahan also wondered what constitutes a “local farmer.” Said Bergersen it’s someone within 400 miles, but they’re hoping to limit that to 150 miles — though they will bring in “fresh” produce that’s not necessarily grown in Texas during peak seasons. At which point he mentioned Hatch chilis, because Central Market.

He also reminded the council that on its eastern side, Shed 1 will have a band shell — and it’s being developed and assembled by none other than Angus Wynne.

The committee was concerned about spending so much public money on a single project in an area of downtown lacking density — but not concerned enough to delay sending the item to council.

Dallas, though, needs to “connect the dots” between Victory Park, the Perot and the market, said chairman Tennell Atkins, reiterating one of his favorite themes.

“Right now there is a disconnect between the farmers market and the Arts District,” he said. “That’s something we need to do — infrastructure. The market is sitting on an island by itself.”

– See more at: http://cityhallblog.dallasnews.com/2013/12/a-very-specific-look-at-the-upgraded-dallas-farmers-market-and-how-it-will-be-funded.html/#sthash.M04hjKlo.dpuf

10 Questions for Purchasing a Condominium

Condo living in Uptown Dallas
  1. How long will I be there?
    Purchasing a condominium is like any other real estate purchase. You’ll need to own the Condo for at least a couple of years in order to recoup the closing costs. For shorter term needs, leasing may be a better option.
  2. What amenities are offered at the complex?
    There are a broad array of potential amenities to a condo complex. Some are sparse with simple covered parking and a little landscaping. Others have grand work out facilities, picnic/barbeque areas, work out facilities, playgrounds, pools, common libraries, media centers, laundry facilities, etc. Determine what extras you are looking for before you begin your search.
  3. What are the current condo market conditions?
    The condo market may be quite different from the single family housing market at any time. And like all real estate, the location of the condo will also make a large difference in the value of the unit. Study recent sales in the neighborhood and building you are seeking. Be sure to account for the differences in amenities between the complexes/buildings when studying these figures.
  4. What is the reputation of the building you are considering?
    Different condominium buildings/complexes have different senses of community. There are many buildings that are principally owner occupied, while others have a stronger tenant base. Some communities have very stable populations while others see more turnover. For example, condo complexes closely located to a large university will likely have a younger population and frequent turnover as students move in and out each year. Determine the characteristics that are important to you and talk to some of the neighbors.
  5. Do the owners get along, or are they at each others throats?
    Condominium ownership is a cooperative community effort. The common areas and structures of the community are supported by payments from all of the owners. By requesting copies of the HOA minutes, you can get a feel for how unified the residents are. No one wants to move into an atmosphere of strife and turmoil. Look to see if there are any hot issues that are burning in the community.
  6. How well funded is the HOA?
    As an owner, you are ultimately responsible for the common maintenance of common amenities and structures. You will pay a monthly HOA fee representative of your “fair share” of these costs. In the event that major repairs or maintenance is required, a special assessment may be charged of all owners
    if the HOA account does not have sufficient balance to cover the expense. You will want to make sure that the HOA is financially sound so that you don’t get hit with an immediate assessment upon buying into the property.
  7. What is the history of Special Assessments?
    Request the Special Assessment history for the last ten years. Take a look at the patterns that have emerged. A well managed condominium should not see regular special assessments.
  8. Are you comfortable with the association rules and by-laws?
    Closely review the rules of the community and make sure that your lifestyle matches with the community that they have developed. Talk with the condo association and the residents to see how closely these rules are enforced. This will be the community that you are joining. You will want to be sure that you like the structure set in place, and that it actually occurs.
  9. What are the parking arrangements for guests?
    As an owner, you will have parking for your vehicles. You will be limited in how many vehicles you can park on the property. Generally, guests will be directed to specific parking places. In some complexes, that parking available for guests may not be either convenient or plentiful. Make sure you understand how parking works, and that it is sufficient for your lifestyle. This seems to be one of the leading sources of aggravation in a condominium community.
  10. Who actually manages the condo property, and what services do they provide?
    Some condominium complexes are self-managed by the owners while others employ a professional management company. For owner occupants, the idea of self-managing can be quite appealing. Who has a more vested interest in the property than the unit owners that live there. For landlords, it is frequently easier to deal with a professional management company than with local owners. Along with association management, be sure to also explore association insurance. Make sure that in the event of catastrophe your investment is protected.

Right Size Your Life – The Time is NOW!!

Another home SOLD by Keller Williams

It has been a banner year for real estate sales in the DFW market. We are experiencing activity levels not seen in many years, and events with which many agents are not familiar. In Collin County, homes priced in the typical range for first time home buyers are receiving multiple offers, frequently on the day which they are listed. During a recent search in which I represented the Buyer, I had conversations with several listing agents indicating they were unfamiliar with how to handle the influx of offers they were receiving. It has been many years since homes attracted multiple offers, and quite frankly, agents who have only been in the market for 3-5 years have never experienced this phenomena.

In east Dallas, the activity levels are also similar. I had the pleasure of representing a Seller who was able to convey their existing home at the highest $/square foot seen in over 5 years. This allowed them to purchase a much larger home, and they got a great deal on the mortgage. For while sales prices are high, interest rates are still at historical lows. This combination makes today the perfect time to right size your life!

Whether you need to increase the size of your living space, or step down into a smaller home and save a little money, there has never been a better time to act.

Our Sacred Honor

As tomorrow is 236th anniversary of our separation from the tyranny of King George, I found myself reading the Declaration of Independence for the first time in many years. I am struck by a number of powerful thoughts in this document:

a) When in the course of human of events it becomes necessary… Quite simply, this is a big deal. In fact the change is so significant that the signers felt absolutely compelled to provide a thorough explanation of grievances. No hiding, no subversion. They had the absolute courage to stand up and say “this is wrong and we are going to change it”.

b) We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness… Now, here’s our beliefs. These are the things that above all must remain true.

c) But when a long train of abuses and usurpations, pursuing invariably the same Object evinces a design to reduce them under absolute Despotism, it is their right, it is their duty, to throw off such Government, and to provide new Guards for their future security… And since you have seen fit to disregard and trample upon the most basic rights of humanity, we have no other choice than to force a change. This is not a “wouldn’t it be nice” decision, rather, this is a compelling obligation.

d) And for the support of this Declaration, with a firm reliance on the protection of Divine Providence, we mutually pledge to each other our Lives, our Fortunes, and our sacred Honor. We are so firmly committed to this decision that we will stake EVERYTHING to see it through.

The passion, clarity and commitment these men held to our well being is staggering. They had about as much chance of being successful as would Chad, Sierra Leone or Burkina if they launched a war with the United States today. Yet they believed in what they were doing, had a vision for a great country, and they pressed forward despite insurmountable odds.

So, remember these men tomorrow. And the next day, take a mere fraction of their passion into your community and make it a better place. It’s the least we can do to honor the memory of those who gave us so much.

Full text of the Declaration of Independence

Golf Course Real Estate Still Has a Pulse in the Heart of Texas

Aerial View - Ols AMerican Golf Course
Aerial View - Old American Golf Course

For many, it’s the American Dream: Life, Liberty and the Pursuit of… Golf Course Living. In 2011, the first Baby Boomers turn 65 and the demand for golf course real estate in Sunbelt states will likely skyrocket as Boomers look for homes in a climate conducive to their hobby.

But those who have long dreamed of living adjacent to fairways and greens could be disappointed. Development of a golf course community is exceedingly rare in this slumping economy. After almost two decades during which new golf course communities spread like wildfire across the Sunbelt, both the real estate and golf industries have suffered major setbacks.

In 2010, builders started on 15,000 homes in the Dallas-Fort Worth area, according to Ted Wilson of Residential Strategies, Inc. That’s down nearly 70% from the 51,000 housing starts in 2006.

New golf course construction has also taken a major hit. The overbuilding of courses in the 90’s and early 00’s oversaturated the market. When the recession descended upon the industry, many courses were forced to close, some in the middle of construction.

With every rule, however, there is an exception. In 2010, only one course opened in The Metroplex. What vaults this course from exception to veritable anomaly is it is part of a residential community.

The Old American Golf Club, located in The Colony’s The Tribute Resort Community, opened its doors to public play in September 2010. In addition to fairways, greens, bunkers and water hazards, The Old American features brand new residential lots alongside select sections of the course and dozens more just off it. In the desert that is the current landscape of new golf course development, The Tribute is an oasis, affording golfers the opportunity to live alongside the game they love.

The Old American and The Tribute were brought to life by Matthews Southwest, a DFW-based developer that has transformed The Metroplex’s real estate market through urban redevelopment and suburban lifestyle development. In The Tribute, Matthews Southwest saw the opportunity to deliver a suburban community where people could enjoy their hobbies right outside their front door. The community’s location on the shores of Lewisville Lake, combined with The Old American and The Tribute Golf Club (opened in 2005), has provided residents with access to golf, boating and fishing.

Even in the down economy, builders and homeowners have pounced on the opportunity The Tribute presents. Matthews Southwest reported a more than 100 percent year-over-year increase in residential lot sales at The Tribute in 2010. The community’s 1,150 acres showcase many of North Texas’ most prominent and distinguished builders, offering home designs that emphasize the Old World-themed atmosphere of The Tribute and begin in the 240’s.

As Baby Boomers and golf enthusiasts search for a place to live in harmony with the game they love, they may be hard up as developers and builders continue to tighten purse strings. However, The Tribute serves as proof that golf course real estate still has a pulse in the Heart of Texas.

How To Best Determine The Value of Your Home

The best tool I have for determining the value of your home is called the Comparative Market Analysis (CMA). When performing a CMA, there are three big questions that I attempt to answer: a) At what price are homes actually selling?; b) What is the competition seeking in terms of price?; and c) How much is too much? The answers to these questions come from three different types of data.

Homes recently sold will give you an answer to the first question. You normally will find a range of sold prices. At the low end are homes that were not in very good condition, and in a neighborhood that is rejuvenating, this may in deed be the value of the lot. At the middle of the range are homes that are structurally sound but still need cosmetic updating. At the high end of the range are the homes that have been remodelled.

The answer to the second question comes from active properties. Here you can see where the competition is priced. In a neighborhood undergoing rennovation, it is very important to at least see pictures of these homes to determine the improvements that have been done.

The final question is answered by homes that have expired. Generally, these homes expired because the seller was asking more in price than the market would bear for a home in that condition. They were asking too much.

The art is to now place your home in the spectrum described. If your home is fully updated with new kitchen, baths, flooring, etc and is great structural shape then you belong at the top of the price list. In older neighborhoods I have heard these homes referred to as 1958 on the outside, 2011 on the inside.

If your home is in average condition, meaning that it has been very well maintained, is clean, and may have a few updates then the value of your home is at or just above the average home value in the neighborhood.

A final clarification on this process. It is vitally important to start with the right set of comparable homes. I generally define a neighborhood by looking at the boundaries formed by large roads, creeks, train tracks, utility easements or other barriers that suggest the edge of the neighborhood. In terms of the actual homes, I try to select homes that are within about 500sf of the target with a similar bed/bath count.

What is the Difference Between Broker and Agent?

A real estate BROKER is licensed to conduct a real estate transaction between a Buyer and a Seller and must be present in every transaction where real estate agents are involved. Most frequently, this person is the head of the real estate office where the agents work.

A real estate AGENT is a professional with a license that must be sponsored by a real estate broker. They are the people that you as a consumer will encounter in the transaction. They work for the real estate broker, and can not complete a real estate transaction without the broker’s oversight.

This creates an apprenticeship in the industry. In most states, a newly licensed professional must work for a broker for a certain number of years before they can qualify to become a broker themselves.

There are also many very experienced agents who have never chosen to pursue a broker’s license. They like working “in the field” as real estate agents, rather than running an office as a broker. They can be very experienced and may have amassed as much or more real estate knowledge than the broker that they work for, but prefer the job of working directly with Buyers and Sellers to that of an office administrator.

So to make a long story short, the broker is the person that runs the real estate office. The agents are the people who work directly with the consumers in the transaction.

Finally, there are some people who are licensed as Brokers, but still perform the role of an agent. This is usually the result of a preference for field vs. office work – at least that is the case with me.

Multiple Offers Vs. Multiple Contracts

Who will win the contract race?

I have encountered this question a few times recently, so I thought I would write a brief explanation.

First, let me clearly say that in the great State of Texas, there can only be one fully executed contract on a property at a time.

Now for the part that seems to create confusion. When dealing with residential real estate, an offer is generally submitted on a contract form and the agents have a habit of referring to offers as contracts. So you may hear that “we have received multiple contracts on this property”. What is really being said is that there are multiplte offers. An offer, even though it is submitted on a contract form, does not become a contract until both Buyer and Seller agree to every term and fully execute the document. Then, to remain a valid contract, the terms specified in the contract must be executed. On of the first of these terms is the deposit of earnest money.

So, when I represent a Buyer and I hear that “there is a contract on the property”, I always ask if it has been fully executed. If the answer is “no”, then it is only an offer, and there may still be a chance for my Buyer to get into the mix.

Now for the multiple offer scenario. As a listing agent, it is always my objective to attract multiple offers on a property. This creates a bidding war environment. When I receive the first offer, I will call other agents who have expressed interest in the property and let them know that we have received an offer. My hope is that it will move their client to action to also submit an offer. If we can get two or more in play at the same time, the outcome is usually better for the Seller.

As a Buyer’s agent, I extend offers that ask for a very quick response to keep the above scenario from happening. If my Buyer’s offer is the only offer in play, that tends to make the negotiation go better for the Buyer.

But at the end of the negotiations, there is only one contract that will get fully executed. The other party may wish to enter into a back-up position. If the first contract does not close, the back-up contract immediately moves into first place without the property going back to market. Finally, there can be only one back-up contract.

After a back-up contract has been executed, any other offers received remain “in limbo” until something happens to the first contract. If the first contract fails to close, the back-up contract moves into first place. If there are still other offers that have come forward, one of these can be selected to go into the back-up position. This continues until the property sale closes.

It is rare to have this much interest in a property, but occasionally it does happen. I have had success in closing back-up contracts from both the Listing and the Buying position.

I hope this provides some clarity on the issue. There can be only one fully executed contract at a time, and the rules for forming a queue behind this contract are very clear – one at a time.

What Does an HOA Do?

The idea of an HOA is that all of the neighbors join together to maintain infratstructure that they all enjoy. HOAs take two forms, voluntary and mandatory.

In a voluntary HOA, membership is just that, voluntary. Each home decides whether or not to participate. The HOA usually does some community building activites, may form a crime watch, and sometimes does little beautification projects like planting flowers by the neighborhood sign.

A mandatory HOA exists when a neighborhood is built with additional community infrastructure such as a community pool, private parks, gated entrance, etc. Membership is mandated in the deed to each property. There are guidelines established for how the HOA is to run, how dues are determined, etc. These HOAs are frequently managed by professional companies and take care of the maintenance of all of the common grounds.

Fees for voluntary HOAs are usually very small – less than $100/yr. Fees for mandatory HOAs all depend on the amount of common infrastructure in the neighborhood and can range from $50 to hundreds of dollars per month.

Wild Lease Scam – Can the Market Get Any Crazier?

I love the real estate market – there’s always a great story to be told, and a new experience to be had. Just when I thought things couldn’t get any crazier, they did. Here’s the story…

I recently represented a young lady in the purchase of her first home. Being a first time home buyer, we were looking at small homes that were financially distressed – we were bargain hunting. We found the perfect home in east Dallas, a 1950’s era 3/2 that was in short sale for about 60% of the value it had appraised for just two years ago. As we toured the home, we could not access the garage – it was locked and the key did not fit. When I later inquired about accessing the garage, I heard the craziest story ever:

After the owner vacated the property, a person we’ll call Joe ConMan noticed that it was vacant. He proceeded to pose on the internet as the owner of the property. He entered into a lease agreement with a unsuspecting young couple, newly married with a small child. He collected the first month’s rent and the damage deposit. On move-in day, the Tenant could not get access to the house. Joe Conman has the Tenant call a locksmith, and then meets them at the property. He cons the locksmith into believing that he is the property owner, gets him to open the house, and then leaves – vanishing to never be seen again.

The Tenant begins moving into the house when a neighbor comes over to investigate. Having not seen either the owner or the owners agent, he calls the listing agent to confirm that the house had been leased. A very surprised listing agent then called the police. The Tenant was forced to vacate the property, and lost the damage deposit and rent they had paid to Joe ConMan.

I learned a couple of lessons from this story. First, get to know the neighbors around your listings, especially if they are vacant. The actions of a consciencious neighbor kept this situation from getting any worse. Second, keep a close eye on your vacant property listings – you never know when something crazy like this might happen to them.

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