IF – Rudyard Kipling

Reconnected with an old friend on Facebook and found this poem on his blog (Running Tyler to Ehningen). IF I can teach these lessons to my sons, then I will have been a successful father. Andre, thanks for reminding me how much I enjoy this verse:

[IF]

If you can keep your head when all about you
Are losing theirs and blaming it on you,
If you can trust yourself when all men doubt you
But make allowance for their doubting too,
If you can wait and not be tired by waiting,
Or being lied about, don’t deal in lies,
Or being hated, don’t give way to hating,
And yet don’t look too good, nor talk too wise:

If you can dream–and not make dreams your master,
If you can think–and not make thoughts your aim;
If you can meet with Triumph and Disaster
And treat those two impostors just the same;
If you can bear to hear the truth you’ve spoken
Twisted by knaves to make a trap for fools,
Or watch the things you gave your life to, broken,
And stoop and build ’em up with worn-out tools:

If you can make one heap of all your winnings
And risk it all on one turn of pitch-and-toss,
And lose, and start again at your beginnings
And never breath a word about your loss;
If you can force your heart and nerve and sinew
To serve your turn long after they are gone,
And so hold on when there is nothing in you
Except the Will which says to them: “Hold on!”

If you can talk with crowds and keep your virtue,
Or walk with kings–nor lose the common touch,
If neither foes nor loving friends can hurt you;
If all men count with you, but none too much,
If you can fill the unforgiving minute
With sixty seconds’ worth of distance run,
Yours is the Earth and everything that’s in it,
And–which is more–you’ll be a Man, my son!

–Rudyard Kipling

Dallas County Taxable Home Values Decrease

Here’s a Spring present for all you homeowners. As usual, the Dallas Central Appraisal District (DCAD) is lagging the market. Just as real estate values and activity are increasing, The Dallas Central Appraisal District has announced that sixty percent (60%) of homeowners will see a decrease in their taxable property value this year – YEAH! That means that most of us will be receiving a decrease in our property tax bill for 2010. Enjoy the break – I believe it will reverse next year!!

The Dallas Central Appraisal District also stated that approximately twenty percent (20%) of home values will rise. I suspect a number of these are homes which had permitted improvements accomplished over the last year, or are recent sales of previously undervalued real estate. The final twenty percent (20%) of values will remain constant.

That’s a fairly substantial move for the Appraisal Distict to have made, adjusting the values of about eighty percent (80%) of the homes in Dallas County.

For a complete report on this issue, please see the Dallas Morning News article.

Veterans: Consider a Zero Down VA Loan

US Military Logos
Link to VA Home Loan Benefits

First, if you have served in the armed forces, thank you for your service! I am proud to have served with the US Navy as both a Surface Warfare Officer and as a recruiter. During my service as a recruiter, I bought my first Dallas home using a VA loan. At closing, I wrote a check that was between $100-200 and got the keys to my brand new home. I also took advantage of a small loan from the Texas Veterans Land Board. Together, these benefits of military service helped me to achieve the dream of home ownership.

I recently received an e-mail with information on obtaining a VA Loan from VA Mortgage Center.com. As they are one of the leading service providers for VA loans, I wanted to share their information with you. Hopefully this will help you achieve the dream of owning a Dallas home.

More than 1.7 million veterans reside in Texas, and about 38,000 live in Bell County where Fort Hood fulfills the role of the largest active duty armored post in the U.S. Yet it’s highly unlikely that all these veterans take advantage of the VA home loan program since less than 10 percent of the nation’s 24 million veterans capitalize on the program.

The VA loan program is one of the last remaining home-buying options that lets borrowers put no money down. Compared to conventional loans, VA home loans tend to offer lower interest rates and eliminate the private monthly mortgage insurance. As a result, borrowing veterans’ monthly payments are greatly reduced.

Fort Hood is full of starter homes that veterans could buy with the help of a VA loan. In 2007 and 2008, homes that cost between $100,000 and $159,999 accounted for 44.3 percent and 45.2 percent of homes sold in the Killeen-Fort Hood area, according to Texas A&M’s Real Estate Center (REC). Even during hard economic times, homes in the Killeen-Temple-Fort Hood area appreciated about 2.5 percent in late 2008 compared to 2007. In the same area, the REC found that the annual average rate for a 15-year fixed mortgage was about 1.2 percent, which is quite borrower-friendly.

By the end of 2008, homes in the U.S. began to depreciate, but Texas’ home values did not, according to the REC. The median house or condominium value in Texas in 2008 was $126,800.

Veterans who want to make use of a VA loan to buy a home in Texas need to confirm their eligibility first. For the most part, veterans who are in one of these categories may have va loan eligibility:

-Military members who’ve served 181 days on active duty or three months during war time
-People who have spent at least six years in the National Guard or Reserves
-Spouses of those killed in the line of duty

The maximum VA loan limit in Texas is $417,000, but it’s important to note that VA does not issue loans, it simply backs about one-quarter of the loan. Because of that insurance, lenders, such as the VA-certified VA Mortgage Center.com, are often happy to help veterans get a loan.

TREC Warns of Real Estate Brokerage Scam

TREC Logo
Texas Real Estate Commission

My Dad always told me that if something seemed too good to be true, it was probably not true. This simple piece of advice has kept me out of many sticky situations. I just received an e-mail from the Texas Real Estate Commission (TREC) warning the public about real estate brokerage scams in the DFW area. I felt compelled to pass the warning along. It is very easy to find out if a person hold a license from the Texas Real Estate Commission – you can look up any persons license number by following this link.

Here is the beginning of the warning message from the Texas Real Estate Commission:

The Texas Real Estate Commission Standards and Enforcement Services Division (TREC) has received complaints against a group of individuals and companies that have been doing business in the Dallas/Fort Worth area. The individuals and companies named in the complaints represent themselves as real estate agents and real estate brokerage companies but do not hold Texas real estate licenses. Owners of real property, tenants, buyers, and investors claim to have lost large sums of money related to the group’s real estate schemes. Among other things, the complainants allege that the group takes and keeps deposits for properties over which they have no authority or no control. They allegedly do not pay rent to property owners on property they claim to manage for those owners, or take large security deposits from tenants and then keep the money. They take deposits or earnest money on properties that they claim are available for a short sale but in reality are days away from foreclosure. Apparently, much of the solicitation of potential victims has been conducted through www.craigslist.com.

For the full article, click here.